Thursday, May 6, 2010

Safety first

Ever heard of the word sterelization.

Okay, lemme make it easier for you to guess.

This term is most oftenly used with surgical instruments, for instance, a syringe, cotton, milk bottles for babies and the like. I really think that it is one of the most commonly used terms in medical science.

Now, would you believe me if I tell you that the guy at the medical store near my office does not know what sterilized cotton means. I asked a peon from the office to get it for me. The peon then calls me on reaching there and says that this guy here isn't able to understand what I had asked for.So, I talked to that guy and I was shocked to know that he indeed had never heard about it. I got so angry, I told him to put shutters on the store and just go home and rest.

This was really shocking for me.

I always thought that the men behind the counters at all medical stores atleast had a fare knowledge about medicines if not being proficient in the field.

Frankly, I think its quite unsafe to have people like these selling something as important as medicines.

Sometimes, the handwriting of the doctors on the prescriptions is not even legible. Do you think you can trust the medical stores.

And what about the times when they do not give a copy of the bill to save a few bucks on the taxes. This is just to add fuel to the fire.

I have always been skeptical about these medical stores.

Is it the same with you...??

16 comments:

Shivani said...

Maybe the guy behind the counter was a peon at the medical store. I'm sure the owner/pharmacist must know about the medical jargons and medicines....
Still.. the country we live in... no degree/diploma can be trusted..

The Bald Guy said...

In India you can open a retail pharmacy outlet without any knowledge of pharmacy.

The license can be had for a mere Rs. 2000 to 3000 max in New Delhi.

Go on.

Open your own Chemist shop.

I'll get you the license.

I'm not kidding.

The Bald Guy said...

That's Rs. 2000 per month rental. Hehe.

Atul said...

r u sure ur peon went to the medical store and not to the local paanwala??

and btw if ur peon knew about the sterilized cotton thing he cud have explained it to that guy @ the counter himself na!

... mebbe ur peon got awl confused... u shld let him chew his share of tumbaakoooo!

Manjari Singh said...

kya baat hai bald guy!!


ya, right he must be some peon

Chanz said...

@ Shivani : I think the ownder or somebody knowledgeable should be present at all times at any medical store.. If the degrees can be made available so easily then we are the ones who will have to suffer always

Chanz said...

@ TBG : well, no. I am really not interested...

btw isnt 2000 too less for rent in delhi..

Chanz said...

@ Atul : arre, he was just a peon.. he didnt know what it meant. I wrote it on a piece of paper and gave it to him...

Chanz said...

@ Manjari : Its necessarry for somebody to be there.. always..

Siddhesh 'Ravan' Kabe said...

system is made up of people and not robots...just that indian system is made up of apes...:)

Chanz said...

@ Sid : and I can see an ape right here wearing a hat.. :D

@ease said...

@ chanz: i thot, u wud discuss somethng else in this post.. :P

Kedar said...

Shocking.. but I think that such cases rarely exist.
The next time i'd go to some chemist, i'll ask him certain basic medical questions like: Which blood group is the universal donor? Define swine flu. Which hormone regulates the colour of skin? What is the full form of DNA?
LOLzzz!! Just imagine his face!!!

Chanz said...

@ @ease : dhoka... :D

Chanz said...

@ kedar : OMG... i think it would be his turn to be shocked..

Wicked Witch of the West said...

Oh, I would love to hear how Kedar's challenge goes. I know in our pharmacies we always have the pharmacist (or a few depending on how busy it is) around but not on the floor or by the counter - usually doing the dispensing. And then we have female (this can't be a requirement due to our legislation but I have never seen a male in this role) pharmacy assistants who help with the stock on the floor and the over the counter medications (which are painkillers and cold medicines) but who will often need to refer to the pharmacists. There is a big difference though, in that in India you can get such an array of medications without a script (antibiotics etc)...so would hope that someone with degree would still deal with that...and that the non qualified would stick to the dishing out of mild painkillers and himalaya products. Here pharmacists make heeeaaaps of money...if it is so easy there, maybe I have found my Indian occupation :D